Scrybe covered in New York Times

September 2, 2007 at 10:44 pm 8 comments

ScrybeMichael Fitzgerald says in today’s New York Times that the success that Faizan Buzdar, 31, and his team at Scrybe have had thus far in getting Adobe Systems and LMKR to invest in the beta product, might have seemed like a long shot to some; especially since Scrybe is based in Islamabad, Pakistan which is hardly known as a haven for software entrepreneurs (his words, not mine) and it is trying to enter a well-established market dominated by Microsoft Outlook in the business world and by Google, Yahoo and a host of smaller companies on the Web.

Then why has this product drawn so much sustained interest? Fitzgerald thinks that Faizan has figured out something fundamental about how we want access to schedules and related information. Scrybe’s tools include a clever interface that features zooming calendar boxes that become bigger when scrolled over, the ability to print in multiple formats, including wallet- and pocket-friendly versions, and a novel notepad that accepts text and images from the Web as well as the usual typed-in notes.

It also works offline, something that Outlook and other existing programs cannot do. One user said he had adopted Scrybe because of its interface and because it did a better job of pulling together data than any other calendar he has used. All of this, says Fitzgerald, has made Scrybe, which remains in beta testing, the most anticipated software at the Museum of Modern Betas, a Web site that tracks emerging Web 2.0 projects. More than 300,000 people have watched the Scrybe YouTube video.

With a PR budget that was nil, they were expecting 10,000 beta users in six months – they got 100,000 in just a few weeks! Well done guys! You have done us proud! This is just the beginning – the world has yet to see the many surprises that will come out of cities in Pakistan – then maybe Pakistan will start being seen as a haven for software entrepreneurs.

For details, read the NY Times article in full.

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8 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Google Country Consultant  |  September 2, 2007 at 11:53 pm

    WOW! This is impressive and great news… masha-Allah!

    We now need to keep the momentum as a nation by working harder and improving our country’s true image…

    Reply
  • 2. Osama A.  |  September 4, 2007 at 1:04 am

    “It also works offline, something that Outlook and other existing programs cannot do.”

    Err… say what?

    Reply
  • 3. Jehan  |  September 4, 2007 at 7:22 am

    This is what Fitzgerald said. I have only quoted the article. If you want to take issue with it, his email address is quoted in the article.🙂

    Reply
  • 5. mansoor  |  September 5, 2007 at 4:57 pm

    i also read the article, and it reads really nice!

    btw, anyone has a scrybe account they can invite me through? they’ve stopped accepting invitations :S

    osama: they’re doing something like what Google Gears does for their reader program, meaning you can take data off the site and use it offline, then when you’re online, it syncs back.

    really nifty way to take the web along with you.

    Reply
  • 6. In turbulent Pakistan, Startups drive a boom : Green & White  |  September 6, 2007 at 8:55 am

    […] a wild guess I would say Scrybe might have had something to do with this — with their story being covered in the New York Times and practically everywhere else, I’d guess they’ve turned some heads towards Pk after […]

    Reply
  • 7. karim  |  September 13, 2007 at 3:32 pm

    Assalaam,

    Nice hearing this. The only edge muslim ummah can get in technology is by starting to innovate new products which make difference. This looks one of them.

    Keep these things coming.

    -Karim, India

    Reply
  • 8. a s m a  |  September 28, 2007 at 9:05 am

    We covered this article on Islamabad Metroblog too🙂

    Hoping to see many other entrepreneurs rising within !!!

    Reply

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